603 449 2654 info@clearstreamwatercraft.com

Alleq 52

$750.00

The West Greenland “Alleq” designed by Björn Thomasson is available in stitch & glue construction for home builders.  In 1959 Emanuelle Koreliussen built a kayak in Greenland – the now famous Illorsuit kayak – for an English visitor.  Back in England this kayak inspired many well-known production kayaks, among them Anas Acuta and Nordkapp.  The Qanik, Nanoq and Alleq are Björn’s takes on this legendary kayak.

The looks is inspired by the Illorsuit, but the hull shape and hydrodynamics are modern, efficient and relevant to an altogether different situation than seal hunting in arctic waters 60 years ago. The Alleq comes with remarkable maneuvering – a bow rudder and edging (relying on impressive end stability) turns the kayak almost in the kayaks length!

To accommodate different paddlers, there are two sizes of the Alleq.  The 55 is closest to the Nanoq/Qanik design.  The 52 is slightly smaller. See the “Hydrostatics” tab for  information on both.

It is offered as a pre-cut plywood kit for home builders.  It can also be custom built by CSCWC.

logo

The kit includes hull and deck panels that are professionally cut and shipped by Chesapeake Light Craft from 3mm and 4mm BS 1088 okoume marine plywood, and the forms from particleboard or MDF.

The kit includes plywood parts to construct recesses for Kajak-Sport 43/30 oval and 24 round hatches (available separately).

The kit includes only the plywood components; solid wood (for the sheer clamp), epoxy, fiberglass, hardware, foot braces, and so on are not included.  It is packed in CLC’s standard kayak shipping carton.

Clear

Description

The West Greenland “Alleq” designed by Björn Thomasson is available in stitch & glue construction for home builders.  In 1959 Emanuelle Koreliussen built a kayak in Greenland – the now famous Illorsuit kayak – for an English visitor.  Back in England this kayak inspired many well-known production kayaks, among them Anas Acuta and Nordkapp.  The Qanik, Nanoq and Alleq are Björn’s takes on this legendary kayak.  The Qanik is a commercial design for Seabird (Norway).  The Nanoq is the strip version (strip kit also available).  Alleq is a sheet panel version, adjusted for S&G, a simplification of the Qanik concept.  It is actually a little closer to the original Illorsuit, that in SOF-technique also has flat surfaces. The hard chines results in a slight loss of speed (to friction and turbulence) and a slight loss of interior volume.

The looks is inspired by the Illorsuit, but the hull shape and hydrodynamics are modern, efficient and relevant to an altogether different situation than seal hunting in arctic waters 60 years ago. The Alleq comes with remarkable maneuvering – a bow rudder and edging (relying on impressive end stability) turns the kayak almost in the kayaks length!

To accommodate different paddlers, there are two sizes of the Alleq.  The 55 is closest to the Nanoq/Qanik design.  The 52 is slightly smaller. See the “Hydrostatics” tab for  information on both.

It is as a pre-cut plywood kit for home builders.  It can also be custom built by CSCWC.

logoIn coordination with Björn Thomasson and Petruskajak of Sweden, we have  used our advanced naval architecture and CAD programs have adapted it to true stitch & glue construction using 3mm and 4mm okoume marine plywood.

The kit feature full bulkheads and a stacked plywood coaming for easy construction.  The kit includes hull and deck panels that are professionally cut and shipped by Chesapeake Light Craft from 3mm and 4mm BS 1088 okoume marine plywood, and the forms from particleboard or MDF.  The kit includes plywood parts to construct recesses for Kajak-Sport 43/30 oval and 24 round hatches (available separately).  The kit includes only the plywood components; solid wood (for the sheer clamp), epoxy, fiberglass, hardware, foot braces, and so on are not included.  It is packed in CLC’s standard kayak shipping carton.

Below is an except from Björn’s website for the strip Nanoq:

Nanoq is a sea kayak with west Greenland ancestry, based on the legendary Illorsuit (or Igdlorssuit) kayak that appeared in England 1959, having a profound influence on English sea kayaks ever since – and that was the inspiration for the Qanik, I designed for Seabird Designs some years ago.

With Seabird now making major changes in the catalogue and market position, I thought it was time for a strip version. And though Qanik was a success among reviewers and customers, there are always things to refine in retrospect. A commercial assignment is a compromise between my ideas on hydrodynamics and usability and the clients ideas on costs and markets needs (imagined or real) – and of course, the necessary adjustments for industrial production.

Turning production Qanik into strip Nanoq, I went back to the original drawings and adjusted the lines to suit strip building. Nanoq will be easier to strip with slightly less friction due to he smooth lines (water prefers simple harmonious curves that are easily achieved in strip). A wood strip kayak will also be lighter and structurally stiffer, resulting in a faster, more maneuverable kayak with slightly more load capacity.

Nanoq has a slightly higher deck and more secondary stability than those of my kayaks with east Greenland influence: Black Pearl, Njord etc. Thus Nanoq can be leaned over 30 degrees without support of the paddle, that in combination with a accentuated rocker means very good maneuverability – a quality often mentioned in reviews – making it the perfect play kayak in surf and in rock gardens. Skeg down, Nanoq becomes a controlled cruiser for long distances with good touring speed. The higher deck is a welcome advantage for those who find Njord a bit tight, but of course a disadvantage for those who appreciate the comfort and control of the tight fit in Njord; as many other paddling options a matter of taste.

Hydrostatics

Design Alleq 52 Alleq 55
Designer Bjorn Thomasson Bjorn Thomasson
Length 17.06 ft 520.00 cm 17.91 ft 546.00 cm
Beam 20.16 in 51.20 cm 20.87 in 53.00 cm
Waterline Length (LWL) 13.99 ft 426.50 cm 14.65 ft 446.50 cm
Waterline Beam (BWL) 19.57 in 49.70 cm 20.35 in 51.70 cm
Design Displacement 200.20 lb 91.00 kg 250.80 lb 114.00 kg
Draft 4.33 in 11.00 cm 5.12 in 13.00 cm
Wetted Surface Area 17.37 sf 1.61 sq m 19.65 sf 1.83 sq m
Surface Area, Total 42.55 sf 3.95 sq m 49.17 sf 4.57 sq m
Approx Boat Weight 35.20 lb 16.00 kg 37.40 lb 17.00 kg
Displaced Volume 3.14 cf 89.00 Liters 4.03 cf 114.00 Liters
LCB (Longitudinal Center of Buoyancy) 7.89 ft 240.40 cm 8.27 ft 252.00 cm
LCB (Longitudinal Center of Buoyancy) 0.46 % 0.46 % 0.46 % 0.46 %
VCB (Vertical Center of Buoyancy) 0.23 ft 7.10 cm 0.28 ft 8.40 cm
LWL / BWL 8.58 8.58 8.64 8.64
Cb (Block) 0.382 0.382 0.378 0.378
Cm (midship Coeff) 0.753 0.753 0.745 0.745
Cp (Prismatic) 0.506 0.506 0.508 0.508
Trans. Metacentric Height 0.89 ft 27.00 cm 0.89 ft 27.20 cm
Resistance at 3 Knots 1.56 lbf 7.00 N 1.70 lbf 7.60 N
Resistance at 5 Knots 6.78 lbf 30.40 N 7.03 lbf 31.50 N

Design Statement

From Björn’s website:

Background and history – a modern Illorsuit

In the summer 1959 a young student, Kenneth Taylor, was sent to Greenland by his professor on a research trip to study kayaks and kayaking culture in the Igdlorsuit area. To Greenland he brought his English plywood kayak – on the journey back he had a real Greenland kayak, built for him by Emanuele Korneliussen in Illorsuit. It measured 505×53 cm and had the low deck – 20 cm in front of the cockpit – and low midship sheer, typical for the region. It was built in six days, with timber imported from Denmark.

Uppmätningsritning av Illorsuitkajaken
A drawing of the Illorsuit kayak

The kayak excited the Scottish paddling community on return, and the lines were recorded by Duncan Winning, discussed and copied. Some plywood and fiberglass copies were produced, tried and forgotten. When Geoff Blackford some years later was designing a new sea kayak, he based Anas Acuta = Stjärtand it quite heavily on Duncan Winning’s drawing but increased the volume and deck height to better suit Europeans. The result became the now famous Anas Acuta (the latin name for the Northern Pintail) – still one of the most “Greenlandic” of production kayak, and still in demand by discriminating paddlers.

Anas Acuta - kajaken
A contemporary Anas Acuta

The Anas Acuta was rejected by alpinist Colin Mortlock looking for an expedition kayak – in his view it did not handle good enough in bad conditions and it was too small for expedition purposes. Frank Goodman worked a little more volume into the hull and christened the result Nordkapp after the expedition goal. These two – Anas Acuta and Nordkapp – became legends and are still in production and still evolving (impressive, but nothing compared to the Swedish VKV Anita, designed in 1930 and still in production!). When Len Ystmark of Seabird Designs asked if I could design something that would appeal to the Anas Acuta aficionados of the world I was excited by the challenge. Having spent some time in an old Acuta some years ago, I had strong feelings about what I liked and disliked about the hull design.

A few things have changed since the sixties. One thing is that more of Korneliussens kayaks have been surveilled (by Harvey Golden, the expert on traditional kayaks), and thus more is known about dimensioning and more specifically how the Ken Taylor kayak was adapted for Ken Taylor. Another is that the changes from the original lines made by Geoff Blackford was of course influenced by the contemporary ideas of Greenland style kayaks: thus the sheer was raised as a unit to create the preferred high fore-deck, resulting in very high stems and an accentuated banana shape – far from the lovely sheer of the Illorsuit kayak. Furthermore, to create volume the bottom was flattened to an extent that it is hard to see any resemblance in the stations shapes. From approx 20 degrees deadrise of the original to approx 8 of Anas Acuta. This is not intended as a criticism of either the kayak or Geoff Blackford – the commercial success and long history would make any such remarks reflect more on my prejudices than on the kayaks.

But still, what would a modern interpretation of the Illorsuit kayak be like? Well, most of the changes made by Blackford still make sense and there is no reason not to do the same today. I raised the sheer and deck sligthly to create room for a western seating position – few of us would be comfortable with straight horizontal legs, a deck barely one inch over the knees and a vertical back without support (I might, after many years in my Black Pearl, but this kayak is not for me alone). I kept the stems just slightly higher than the original lines, in an attempt to preserve the understated elegance of the Illorsuit (well, I am obsessed with the beauty of lines: be warned!) – and of course to avoid the windage of high stems. I also flattened the bottom though not as much as in the Anas Acuta. The reason for not sticking to the 20-degree deadrise is that it would have forced the seat up higher, thus decreasing stability and necessitating an even higher deck.

In Greenland the Illorsuit has evolved along similar lines as well – towards longer waterlines and less deadrise making the kayaks faster, roomier at the expense of a little maneuverability – or in the direction of kayaks with very low freeboard for rolling competitions (which is where my Black Pearl belongs).

So in the end my design is at least a cousin to the Anas Acuta, but with a personal edge: a few inches longer since the low speed was one of my dislikes, lower stems that will make it easier on the paddler in high winds (even if the Acuta isn’t bad at this) and with a slightly lower deck (sea kayak decks have lost a couple of millimeters per year the last decades as more paddlers begin to appreciate the comfort and control attainable simply by getting rid of old excesses in superfluous cockpit volume (note that this still is a roomy cockpit – those looking for a really tight Greenland cockpit may consider the Black Pearl). I also hope that my take on the Illorsuit will offer easier and more predictable movements in steep choppy seas and that surfing will be at least as good. And not the least – I downplayed the banana. (Love bananas? No problem, there still is the Anas Acuta…)

Stitch & Glue Kit: Plywood Components

This is a basic CNC-cut kit.  The hull panels, deck panels and coaming parts are professionally cut by Chesapeake Light Craft from 3mm or 4mm BS 1088 okoume marine plywood, depending on the design.  The forms are cut from particleboard or MDF.  This kit includes only the plywood components. Any solid wood for the sheer clamp, masik and other deck beams, epoxy, fiberglass, hardware, footbraces, and so on are not included.  We encourage you to purchase those from local sources.

The kit is packed in CLC’s standard kayak shipping carton.  It’s pretty light so shipping is inexpensive.  We’ll contact you with a shipping quote once you’ve placed your order, and you’ll approve the shipping before you’re charged for the kit.

Additional information

Boat Type

,

Design

Designer

Construction Method

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Alleq 52”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like…

High performance kayaks, canoes and other small boats. Crafted individually in the USA.